Sourcebook

March 27, 2018

A Vast Hospital:

“About Us,” The Presbyterian Church in Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

Michael, Anton. “Civil War Cannonballs Stuck in Walls, 150 years Later — Fredericksburg, VA,” So I think I’m a photographer now. Posted 23 December, 2012. Accessed 19 March 2018.

“Building History: Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg” Daniel & Company, Inc. Contractors. 2014.

Schmidt, Jim. “Medical Department #34 – Historic Churches (and Hospitals) of Fredericksburg,” Civil War Medicine (And Writing): A Blog on Civil War-Era Medicine and my Own Historical Research and Writing. Posted on 30 April 2009. Accessed 19 March 2018.

Faust, Patricia L. Historical Times Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. New York, NY: Harper Perennial, 1991.

 

A Vibrant, But Segregated Community:

“Church History,” Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site). 2014.

Fitzgerald, Ruth Coder. A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford, and Spotsylvania, Virginia. Chicago, IL: Unicorn Publishing Group, 1979.

Nicholls, Michael L. “Strangers Setting among Us: The Sources and Challenge of the Urban Free Black Population of Early Virginia.” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 108, no. 2. 2000

 

Angel of Marye’s Heights:

Kershaw, J. B. “Richard Kirkland, The Humane Hero of Fredericksburg.” Southern Historical Society Papers, vol. VIII. April, 1880.

“1LT Richard Rowland Kirkland,” Find A Grave. 2006.

 

Auction Block:

Jett, Cathy. “Fredericksburg Slave Auction Block has a history of controversy” Fredericksburg.com. Published 22 August, 2017. Accessed March 20, 2018.

Hennessy, John. ”Fredericksburg seems to be the best place to sell slaves in the State”: More evidence on the Auction Block.” Fredericksburg Remembered – Musing on history, public history, and historic Fredericksburg. Published 11 June, 2010. Accessed 20 March 2018.

— — “Fredericksburg’s Disputed Auction Block, Part 1”.  Published 4 June 2010. Accessed 20 March 2018.

— — “Fredericksburg’s Disputed Auction Block, Part 2.” Published 5 June 2010. Accessed 20 March 2018.

 

Barton Street Potter’s Field

Battle, Emily. “Maury School’s midterm look Work continues on conversion.” The Free Lance-Star; Fredericksburg, Virginia, January 2, 2007. Retrieved 16 April 2018.

“Matthew Fontaine Muary School” (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. United States Department of the Interior; National Park Service. Retrieved 12 April 2018.

Strange, Julie-Marie. “Only a Pauper Whom Nobody Owns: Reassessing the Pauper Grave C. 1880-1914.” Past & Present, no. 178 (2003): 148-75. 

The Free Lance-Star; Fredericksburg, Virginia.  “Marker placed at Maury Commons to commemorate cemetery.” December 19, 2011. Retrieved 12 April 2018.

 

Bound For Freedom

“A History of the Fredericksburg Congregation That Became Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site),” Shiloh Old Site Org. Accessed: April 16, 2018.

Henderson, Steward T., “Ex-Slave John Washington,” Emerging Civil War. Accessed: April 24, 2018. 

Hennesy, John. “John Washington and the Emergence of a Voice for Fredericksburg’s Slaves, Part 1,” Fredericksburg History. Accessed: April 24, 2018.

 

Bridgewater Mills:

Comp, Allan T.  “Grain and Flour in Eastern Virginia: 1800-1860.” Accessed 22 March, 2018. Newark, DE: University of Delaware, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1978.

Fredericksburg Area Tourism Department. “Walk Through History…Mill Sites and Water Power.” Central Rappahannock Regional Library. 2014. Accessed 22 March, 2018.

Hennessy, John. “The Exodus Begins: John Washington’s Greatest Journey,” Mysteries & Conundrums: Exploring the Civil War-era Landscape in the Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania Region. Published 2 May 2012. Accessed 22 March 2018.

The Journal of Fredericksburg History, Vol. 2. Fredericksburg, VA: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc., 1997.

 

Brompton – Battle of Fredericksburg:

Pfanz, Donald C. “Brompton: Front Door on the Battle.” Fredericksburg.com. Accessed 22 March 2018.

Freeman, Douglas S, Susanne Christian, Frances Archer, & Massie Williams, ed. Homes And Gardens in Old Virginia. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger Publishing, 2006.

Alvey, Edward Jr.  History of Mary Washington College 1908-1972. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1974.

“John Lawrence Marye, Sr.,” Find A Grave. accessed 22 March 2018.

Wachtmeister, Sofie. “Brompton (Marye House) Fredericksburg.” The Clio. Published 27 April, 2014. Accessed 22 March 2018.

Brooks, Victor. Marye’s Heights, Fredericksburg: Battleground America. Boston, MA: Da Capo Press, 2001.

Reed, William Howell.  Hospital Life in the Army of the Potomac. W. V. Spencer Publishers, 1866.

 

 

Calvin Coolidge:

“History and Culture,” Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park, NPS, last updated December 28, 2015, accessed April 2, 2018.

“George Washington at Chatham,” Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park, NPS. Last updated July 24, 2015, accessed April 2, 2018.

“Thomas Jefferson,” Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park, NPS. Last updated July 19, 2015, accessed 2 April 2018.

Lavelle, Maureen. “Ellen Mitchell,” Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park, NPS. Last updated July 16, 2016. Accessed 2 April 2018.

 

Clara Barton:

“Clara Barton at Chatham,” National Park Service. Accessed 23 March 2018.

Barton, Clara. The Story of My Childhood. New York, NY: Arno Press Inc., 1980.

Janet, James Edward, James Wilson, and Paul Boyer. Notable American Women 1607 – 1950: A Biographical Dictionary. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1971.

 

Contact: An Industrial Society Confronts A Native Culture:

Rountree, Helen C., Wayne E. Clark, & Kent Mountford. John Smith’s Chesapeake Voyages: 1607 – 1609. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2007.

 

Corporation Court House:

“A Historic Bell in Fredericksburg Rings Out a Love Story,” Fredericksburg Today. Published 11 February 2017. Accessed 27 March 2018.

“Circuit Court for the City of Fredericksburg, VA,” Fredericksburgva.gov. Accessed 27 March 2018.

Cummings, John F.; III. Images of America: Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania Court House. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2002.

Martello, Robert. Midnight Ride, Industrial Dawn: Paul Revere and the Growth of American Enterprise. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. 

 

First Town Hall and Market House

“About the Fredericksburg Area Museum.” Fredericksburg Area Museum. https://famva.org/about/. Accessed March 31, 2018.

Hise, Judith. United States Department of the Interior National Park Service. “Fredericksburg Town Hall and Meeting Square.” National Register of Historic Places. Accessed 31 March 2018.  http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Fredericksburg/111-0057_FredericksburgTownHallAndMarketSquare_1994_Final_Nomination.pdf

Hodge, Robert. “Market House Town Hall.” Central Rappahannock Library. Accessed April 1, 2018. http://www.librarypoint.org/market_house_town_hall.

Fredericksburg

“Colony to Nation.” Fredericksburg. https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/index.aspx?NID=778, (Accessed April 5, 2018).

“Early National Period.” Fredericksburg. https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/index.aspx?NID=779. (Accessed March 31, 2018).

Hintz, Suzanne Steiner and Laura Daughtry. The Fredericksburg Connection: Selected Readings Tracing the History of Fredericksburg, and Stafford and Spotsylvania Counties. Fredericksburg, VA.: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, 1980.

“Mary Washington House,” Preservation Virginia, https://preservationvirginia.org/visit/historic-properties/mary-washington-house, (Accessed March 31, 2018).

“New Dominion.” Fredericksburg. https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/index.aspx?NID=784. (accessed April 14, 2018).

Fitzgerald, Ruth Coder. A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford and Spotsylvania, Virginia. Fredericksburg, VA: Unicorn, 1979.

“Reconstruction and Growth (1865-1917).” Fredericksburg. https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/index.aspx?NID=782, (Accessed April 10, 2018).

“The Antebellum Period (1830-1860).” Fredericksburg. https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/index.aspx?NID=780, (accessed March 31, 2018).

“University History.” UMW Libraries. http://libraries.umw.edu/university-history/. (Accessed April 14 2018).

“World War I to World War II (1917-1945).”Fredericksburg. https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/index.aspx?NID=783,(Accessed April 14, 2018). 

Fredericksburg Baptist Church

Davies, Janice P., Bernice Easley, Faye Jones, Roland Moore, Mark W. Olsen, and Dee Simmons. “A History of Fredericksburg Congregation that Became Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site).” Accessed March 31, 2018.  http://www.shiloholdsite.org/narrative.html.

Duvall, Jim. Andrew Broaddus: Early Baptist Minister, 1789-1848. Annals of the American Baptist Pulpit. Accessed March 31, 2018.  http://baptisthistoryhomepage.com/broaddus.andrew.annalsbio.html

Fitzgerald, Ruth Coder. A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford, and Spotsylvania Virginia. United States of America: Unicorn, 1979.

“Our History: The Distinguished Heritage of Fredericksburg Baptist Church.” Fredericksburg Baptist Church. Accessed March 31, 2018. http://www.fredericksburgbaptistchurch.org/history 

 

Fredericksburg City Docks- Bridges and Biscuits

Hintz, Suzanne Steiner and Laura Daughtry. “A Brief History of Fredericksburg” The Fredericksburg Connection: Selected Readings Tracing the History of Fredericksburg, and Stafford and Spotsylvania Counties. Fredericksburg, VA: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, 1980, 21.

Fitzgerald, Ruth. “African American History of Fredericksburg.” Central Rappahannock Regional Library. Accessed March 31, 2018.  http://www.librarypoint.org/african_american_history_of_fredericksburg_virginia.

“Fredericksburg.” Civil War Trust. https://www.civilwar.org/learn/civil-war/battles/fredericksburg. Accessed March 31, 2018.

 

Fredericksburg National Cemetery

“History of the Fredericksburg National Cemetery.” Fredericksburg National Cemetary. Accessed April 1, 2018.  https://fredericksburgnationalcemetery.omeka.net/history 

“Fredericksburg National Cemetery Fredericksburg, Virginia.” National Park Service. Accessed April 1, 2018. https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/national_cemeteries/virginia/Fredericksburg_National_Cemetery.html

“Memorial Day Through the Years: Remembering the Fallen.” National Park Foundation. Accessed April 1, 2018. https://www.nationalparks.org/connect/blog/memorial-day-through-years-remembering-fallen

 

Fredericksburg United Methodist Church

“Francis Ashbury and the Shape of American Methodism.” The United Methodist Church. Accessed April 1, 2018. http://www.gcah.org/history/asbury

“Our History.” Fredericksburg United Methodist Church. Accessed April 1, 2018. http://fumcva.org/about/

Quinn, S.J. The History of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Richmond, VA: Hermitage Press, 1908.

 

From Burying Ground to Park:

Fredericksburg Area Tourism Department. “Walk Through History…Hanover Street.” Central Rappahannock Regional Library. Accessed April 5, 2018.

“Hurkamp Park.” Fredericksburg Timeless. Accessed April 5, 2018.

Quinn, S.J. The History of the City of Fredericksburg (Richmond, VA: Hermitage Press, Inc. Accessed April 5, 2018.

Snider, Betty Hayden and Cathy Jett. “People Behind the Names.” Fredericksburg. Accessed April 5, 2018.

“St. George’s Church located in Hurkamp Park?.” St. George’s History. Accessed April 5, 2018.

 

George Rogers Clark:

Embry, Alfred T. The History of Fredericksburg. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger Publishing, 1937.

Fisher, James. “A Forgotten Hero Remembered, Revered and Revised: The Legacy and Ordeal of George Rogers Clark.” vol. 92, issue 2, (June 1996),

“George Rogers Clark: National Historic Park Indiana,” National Park Service. Accessed March 31, 2018.  https://www.nps.gov/gero/learn/historyculture/clark.htm, 

“The Fall of Fort Sackville-Timeline.” Indiana Historical Bureau. http://www.in.gov/history/2421.htmAccessed March 31, 2018. 

Palmer, Frederick. Clark of the Ohio: A Life of George Rogers Clark. Ohio: Kessinger Publishing.

 

George Washington’s Boyhood Home at Ferry Farm

“The Washington House at Ferry Farm,” Kenmore Org. Accessed: April 23, 2018.

“Washington’s Boyhood,” Kenmore Org. Accessed: April 23, 2018.

 

“Hostages”

Amrhine, Richard. “Bank Building is Vault of History.” Free Lance-Star. Published June 28, 2016. Accessed April 5, 2018. http://www.fredericksburg.com/townnews/bank/bank-building-is-vault-of-history/article_699b710d-dd5f-56c3-9e6f-955b1f9f2e58.html.

Anthony, Elizabeth, Kathy Gould, Martha Harding, Claire Kelly, and Victoria Via. The National Bank of Fredericksburg. Preservation Reports: Virginia Sites and Structures. edited by Belle Pendleton. Fredericksburg, Virginia: Center for Historic Preservation, 1982.

Hennessy, John. “Is this the most important era building in the Fredericksburg region?.” Mysteries and Conundrums.  Published August 1, 2014. Accessed April 5, 2018. https://npsfrsp.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/is-this-the-most-important-civil-war-era-building-in-the-fredericksburg-region/.

Houston, Lemuel W..”Farmers Bank of Fredericksburg” National Register of Historic Places. United States Department of the Interior. Published January 18, 1983. Accessed April 5, 2018.  https://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Cities/Fredericksburg/111-0021_FarmersBankofFredericksburg_1983_Final_Nomination.pdf.

Quinn, S.J.. The History of the City of Fredericksburg Virginia. ebook. Richmond, VA: Hermitage Press Inc., 1908. 

 

Hugh Mercer

Dacus, Jeff. “Hugh Mercer: Doctor and Warrior.” Journal of the American Revolution. Accessed April 1, 2018. https://allthingsliberty.com/2017/01/hugh-mercer-doctor-warrior/

Felder, Paula S.. “Hugh Mercer: An Unexpected Life.” Fredericksburg (VA) Freelance Star. Published September 4, 2004.

Goolrick, John Tackett. The life of General Hugh Mercer: With Brief Sketches of General George Washington. New York: Neale Pub. Co., 1906.

“Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop.” Washington Heritage Museum. Accessed April 1, 2018. https://www.washingtonheritagemuseums.org/museums

Wilshin, Francis F. “Fredericksburg in the Revolution.” In The Fredericksburg Connection edited by Susanne Steiner Hintz and Laura Daughtry Smart. Fredericksburg, VA: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, 1980.

 

Kenmore:

Duke, Jane Taylor. Kenmore and the Lewises. Garden City: Doubleday, 1949.

Fleming, Vivian M. The Kenmore Mansion: Built in 1752, Home of Colonel Fielding Lewis and his Wife, Betty Washington. Fredericksburg: The Kenmore Association, 1924.

Goolrick, John T. Old Homes and History Around Fredericksburg. Richmond: Garrett & Massie, 1929.

Whidden, R. W. Kenmore 1752: Fifty Years As A National Shrine. Richmond: Whittet & Shepperson, 1972.

Willis, Barbara P., and Paula S. Felder. Handbook of Historic Fredericksburg Virginia. Fredericksburg: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, 1933.

 

Liberty Town:

Gatza, Mary B. Liberty Town: The Past and Present of a Fredericksburg Suburb. Virginia Sites and Structures. Fredericksburg, VA: Center for Historic Preservation, Mary Washington College, 1994.

Scott, Matt. and Stanton, Gary. “Henry Dane: African American Builder and Visionary,” Historic Fredericksburg Foundation Org. Accessed: April 21, 2018.

 

Masonic Cemetery:

Edmunds, Jeffrey G., “250 Years of Freemasonry in Fredericksburg,” Library Points Org. Accessed: April 21, 2018. 

“History,” Masonic Lodge 4 Org. Accessed: April 21, 2018. 

Willis, Barbara P. and Felder, Paula S. Handbook of Historic Fredericksburg Virginia. Fredericksburg: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, 1933.

 

Marye’s Height:

Brooks, Victor. Marye’s Heights, Fredericksburg. Battleground America Guides. Conshohocken, PA: Combined Publishing, 2001.

Galwey, Thomas. “Fredericksburg and the Assault on Marye’s Heights.” The Catholic World, A Monthly Magazine of General Literature and Science (1865-1906) 50, no. 297, 1889.

Goolrick, John T. Old Homes and History Around Fredericksburg. Richmond: Garrett & Massie, 1929.

 

Ravaged Town:

“Civil War (1861-1865),” Fredericksburg Virginia gov. Accessed: April 15, 2018.

Banks, John. “Destruction Caused by Union Army on Caroline Street,” Citywarthenandnow.blogspost. May 12, 2016.

Galwey, Thomas. “Fredericksburg and the Assault on Marye’s Heights.” The Catholic World, A Monthly Magazine of General Literature and Science (1865-1906) 50, no. 297, 1889.

Hennessy, John. “Voices from the Storm: Civilians Endure the Battle of Fredericksburg,” Civil War gov. Accessed: April 15, 2018.

“Views in Fredericksburg, Va., showing the destruction of houses by bombardment on December 13, 1862,” Library of Congress. Accessed: April 15, 2018.

Willis, Barbara P. and Felder, Paula S. Handbook of Historic Fredericksburg Virginia. Fredericksburg: Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, 1933.

“10 Facts: Fredericksburg,” Civil War gov. Accessed: April 15, 2018.

 

Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site):

“A History of the Fredericksburg Congregation That Became Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site),” Shiloh Old Site Org. Accessed: April 16, 2018.

“National Register of Historic Places Program: Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site),” National Park Services. Accessed: April 16, 2018.

 

Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site):

“A History of the Fredericksburg Congregation That Became Shiloh Baptist Church (Old Site),” Shiloh Old Site Org. Accessed: April 16, 2018.

Celebrating Our Heritage: Holy, hallowed and historical 1888-1998; Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site). Galion, Ohio: United Church Directories, 1998.

Church History,” Shiloh Baptist Church (New Site), 2014.

 

The Canal Ditch

Finfrock, Bradley. Across the Rappahannock. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 1994.

Savas, Theodore P. and David A. Woodbury. Blood on the Rappahannock: The Battle of Fredericksburg. Campbell, CA: Regimental Studies, Inc., 1995.

 

The Corporation Burying Ground

O’Reilly, Francis. The Fredericksburg Campaign. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Press, 2003.

 

The Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac

Brooks, Victor. The Fredericksburg Campaign: October 1862 – January 1863. Conshohocken, PA: Combined Publishing, 2000.

Luvaas, Jay and Harold Nelson. Guide to the Battles of Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1994.

O’Reilly, Francis. The Fredericksburg Campaign. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Press, 2003.

Scott, De’Onne C. Postcard History Series: Fredericksburg. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2006.

Stackpole, Edward J. The Fredericksburg Campaign: Drama on The Rappahannock. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1991.

The Sentry Box

Embrey, Alvin T. History of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Richmond, VA: Old Dominion Press, 1937.

Cummings, John F. Images of America: Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania Court House. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2002.

Goolrick, John T. Historic Fredericksburg: The Story of an Old Town. Richmond: Higginson Book Company, 1998.

Schenawolf, Harry. “Colonel Weedon’s Tavern, Fredericksburg, VA 1735-1807.” Revolutionary War Journal. October 5, 2015. Retrived April 23, 2018. 

“Sentry Box” (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. United States Department of the Interior; National Park Service. Retrieved 23 April 2018.

 

The Sunken Road

Finfrock, Bradley. Across the Rappahannock. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 1994.

Johnson, Virginia. A Return to Sunken Road. The Central Rappahannock Regional Library. Accessed April 19 2018. 

National Park Service. Sunken Road/Stone Wall Sector of Fredericksburg Battlefield. Accessed April 19 2018.

Savas, Theodore P. and David A. Woodbury. Blood on the Rappahannock: The Battle of Fredericksburg. Campbell, CA: Regimental Studies, Inc., 1995.

 

To The Confederate Dead

Cummings, John F. Images of America: Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania Court House. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2002.

History. Fredericksburg Confederate Cemetery and The Ladies’ Memorial Association. Accessed April 19, 2018

Scott, De’Onne C. Postcard History Series: Fredericksburg. Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2006.

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. Reverend J. William Jones, Ed. Monument to the Confederate dead at Fredericksburg, Virginia, unveiled June 10, 1891. Accessed April 19, 2018. 

 

The Lewis Store

Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. Lewis Store-National Register of Historic Places Listing. Accessed April 23, 2018. 

“The Lewis Store” (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. United States Department of the Interior; National Park Service. Retrieved 23 April 2018.

 

The Heights at Smith Run

White, Kristopher. Encyclopedia Virginia. Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, 29 Nov. 2012. Accesed 23 April 2018. 

 

Willis Hill Cemetery

“Willis Hill During the Civil War,” National Parks Service. Accessed: April 24, 2018.